The museum is situated in the Medieval City of Rhodes in the former women’s prayer rooms of the “Kahal Kadosh Shalom”, the oldest functioning Synagogue in Greece, dated from 1577.

The main focus of the Jewish Museum of Rhodes is to shed light on as many aspects of the life of the people as possible, their faith, activities and creativity, so as to produce a clear picture of the past and present of the Jews of Rhodes, one of the most significant Greek Jewish Communities.

The museum is divided into thematic units: the historical introduction, social and communal life, religious life, costume and domestic textiles, the Second World War and the Holocaust. The artifacts on display accompanying each thematic section were donated to the museum by diaspora Rhodians.

The museum wishes to stimulate and strengthen public appreciation, knowledge and understanding of Jewish culture, heritage and history. Also, to educate toward tolerance and diversity and to honor the memory of the community which was vanished during the WWII.

Address

Jewish Museum of Rhodes
Simmiou & Dossidaou
85100
Greece

Get in touch

+30 2241022364
www.jewishrhodes.org
jcrhodes@otenet.gr
The museum was established in October 1997 with the initiative of Aron Hasson, a third generation Rhodesli with the cooperation of the Jewish Community of Rhodes. It is located in the Medieval City of Rhodes in the former women’s prayer rooms of the “Kahal Kadosh Shalom”, the oldest functioning Synagogue in Greece, dated from 1577. It started as a small exhibition of photographic material, documenting prewar Jewish life on Rhodes. In 2002, with the cooperation of the Jewish Museum of Greece, a permanent exhibition with panels was put on display. Gradually in 2006 with the motivation and the economic contribution of the Community and individual donors, the Museum was expanded to its current size and content.
The collection consists of tombstones of great historical and artistic value dating from 1400, Judaica artifacts, historical documents, religious books, costumes and domestic textiles. The museum’s most precious artifacts are a 16th century Torah scroll, written in Sephardic script, and a handmade “Megillah” from 1862.

From the collection

"Cucharera", a silver serving ware, a traditional gift bestowed upon the bride in early 20th century