Retrieving data for European Jewish Museums

Advisory Visits Grant Programme – 2018

By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

The Advisory Visits Grant Programme (AVGP) is developed to assist AEJM members in need of consultancy by museum experts. The AVGP offers small grants to support member museums in need of consultancy on specific key-issues for Jewish museums. By this means, the AEJM is able to provide its member institutions with expert advice and in house-training through the support of visits by museum experts to its grantees. Below a short report on the three advisory visits that took place in 2018: Jewish Cultural Quarter, Amsterdam Thamar Bernett, educator at Jewish Museum London, and Zuzana Pavlovska, educator at Jewish Museum Praque, visited the Jewish Cultural Quarter in Amsterdam. Together they advised good practice when setting up and running a Holocaust Learning Programme and brainstormed about ideas on how to approach and integrate Jewish Values. The museum experts shared how the Holocaust is taught in a Jewish setting in London and Prague and explored how similar approaches could be… | Read more »

  1. New Board Members

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    AEJM is happy to introduce two new board members! Abigail Morris Abigail Morris joined the Jewish Museum as Chief Executive in 2012. Abigail has a… | Read more »

  2. CAJM Conference – Los Angeles

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    The Council of American Jewish Museums is delighted to open registration for its next conference, The Creative Challenge: Museums for the Next Generation, to be… | Read more »

  3. Annual Report on Activities of the Foundation for Jewish Heritage

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    This has been a crucial year for the Foundation for Jewish Heritage in becoming more firmly established within the cultural heritage scene in the… | Read more »

Remembering the Kindertransport

On display at Jewish Museum London
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To mark the 80th anniversary of the Kindertransport, discover the stories of six of the Kinder (child refugees) in their own words. In 1938-39 the British government allowed 10,000 Jewish and other ‘non-Aryan’ children from occupied Europe to come to Britain. This remarkable rescue operation became known as the Kindertransport. Now in their 80s and 90s, the Kinder have given their testimony through the medium of film. You can also see personal objects and artefacts that they brought with them from their homelands. As children they escaped violence and persecution, but went through painful separations, and their integration into British society was not always straightforward. This exhibition tells the story of rescue as well as stories of rupture, loss and regret. #kindertransport80

  • history
  • film/video
  • community
  • social history
  1. "Als Fels errichtet, um zu danken" on medieval synagogue architecture.

    On display at Old Synagogue Erfurt
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    • history
    • cultural history
    • architecture
    • heritage
  2. Say Shibboleth! On Visible and Invisible Borders

    On display at Jewish Museum Hohenems
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    • history
    • social history
    • film/video
    • post war history
    • contemporary art
    • photography
    • holocaust
  3. 1933

    On display at Jewish Culture Museum Augsburg-Swabia
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    • cultural history
    • contemporary art
    • art
    • holocaust
    • history