Retrieving data for European Jewish Museums

Call for Presentations: Project Slam Budapest 2018featured

By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

The AEJM Annual Conference is a unique opportunity to showcase your projects to Jewish museums and museum professionals across Europe. During the Project Slam session in Budapest, recent and upcoming special projects will be presented in short (10 min.) and discussed. Special projects? New core exhibitions; collaborative projects of different Jewish museums; educational or digital projects, marketing research, exhibitions etc, all with international appeal or dimensions etc. We invite our members to submit proposals for presentations. Deadline for proposals: October 1, 2018  Please send your short proposal (not more than half a page) to AEJM’s Conference Coordinator, Nikki Boot: nikki.boot@aejm.org. Selected projects will be invited by mid-October.

  1. Preliminary Programme AEJM Conference 2018 Budapest

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    The AEJM Conference 2018 The Politicisation of Museums. European Jewish Museums: Consequences and Responses will take place in Budapest from Sunday 18 until Tuesday 20 November…. | Read more »

  2. Oshpitzin, the new app of the Jewish Museum in Oświęcim/Auschwitz

    By AEJM on

    The Jewish Museum in Oświęcim has just released a brand new version of its innovative app “Oshpitzin”. Visitors to the museum can take advantage… | Read more »

  3. The guidebook to the Jewish cemetery of Oświęcim/Auschwitz

    By AEJM on

    The Jewish Museum in Oświęcim has just published a book about the local Jewish cemetery which offers a glimpse into its history and current… | Read more »

Jews and the House of Orange. 400 years of history

On display at Jewish Historical Museum Amsterdam
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Prince William of Orange (1533-1584) proved himself a great champion of freedom of conscience. During this period, when Europe was primarily dominated by strong, absolutist rulers and the persecution of religious minorities was rife, the Dutch Republic occupied a unique position: freedom of conscience was guaranteed and went hand in hand with a sense of safety. The principle of freedom of conscience provided the basis on which Sephardi and Ashkenazi Jews were admitted to the Dutch Republic at the beginning of the seventeenth century. They built up good relations with the country’s different public authorities: the States-General, the Provincial Executive, local burgomasters (mayors), and stadholders. They would establish an especially close relationship with the stadholders and their descendants – the sovereign rulers of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. This exhibition looks at that relationship, a bond that changed from one period to the next, but that seemed to be fundamentally unassailable, assuring the Jewish… | Read more »

  • cultural history
  • photography
  • film/video
  • textiles & clothing
  • community
  • painting
  • 19th century
  • ephemera
  • social history
  • art
  • judaica
  • artefact
  • drawing & prints
  • religion
  • holocaust
  • heritage
  • decorative arts
  • post war history
  • history
  • manuscripts
  1. Astérix in Britain: The Life and Work of René Goscinny

    On display at Jewish Museum London
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    • design
    • contemporary art
    • social history
    • art
    • history
    • drawing & prints
  2. A Muslim, a Christian and a Jew. Eran Shakine

    On display at Jewish Museum Munich
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    • painting
    • contemporary art
    • sculpture
    • art
    • religion
    • performance
  3. BLOOD: UNITING and DIVIDING

    On display at Galicia Jewish Museum
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    • etnography
    • cultural history
    • social history
    • art
    • religion
    • history