Retrieving data for European Jewish Museums

Rothschild Foundation Hanadiv Europe – Grants Programmes open for applications

By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

The Rothschild Foundation Hanadiv Europe welcomes applications for the Spring grant round in all of its  grants programmes:   Archives and Libraries Grants Programme is open for applications Repositories across the breadth of Europe tell the story of the Jewish presence on this continent, from the Medieval period all the way up to the present day. Often fragmentary, at times fragile and generally underused, these records are some of the last surviving links between historic communities and the contemporary researchers investigating them. To enable and encourage access to documents of Jewish significance, the Rothschild Foundation Hanadiv Europe offers the grants detailed below. We welcome applications from any organisation or institution active in Europe (this includes non-EU member states, such as Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Gibraltar, Iceland, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Liechtenstein, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Norway, Russia, Serbia, Switzerland, Turkey, and Ukraine), where activities qualify as charitable under UK charity law.   Jewish  Education… | Read more »

  1. Advisory Visits Grant Programme – 2018

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    The Advisory Visits Grant Programme (AVGP) is developed to assist AEJM members in need of consultancy by museum experts. The AVGP offers small grants to… | Read more »

  2. New Board Members

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    AEJM is happy to introduce two new board members! Abigail Morris Abigail Morris joined the Jewish Museum as Chief Executive in 2012. Abigail has a… | Read more »

  3. CAJM Conference – Los Angeles

    By AEJM / Robbie Schweiger on

    The Council of American Jewish Museums is delighted to open registration for its next conference, The Creative Challenge: Museums for the Next Generation, to be… | Read more »

1933

On display at Jewish Museum Augsburg Swabia
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After Hitler had been appointed Reichskanzler in 1933, the life of the Jewish population in Germany changed abruptly: the expulsion of Jews from public life and society began. As a measure, it was decided to remove the „Jewish“ names or names marked as such from the alphabet table and to burn books by Jewish authors. The aim of this populist symbolic policy was to divide the German population into Jews and non-Jews. From Anton to Zeppelin, the alphabet and its spelling table have now become carriers of a German, non-Jewish identity – which has continued to this day. The multi-part installation by Ramesch Daha, Vienna, will be presented in the foyer of the museum as a work by the artist created especially for the museum.

  • history
  • cultural history
  • contemporary art
  • art
  • holocaust
  1. Roman Vishniac Rediscovered

    On display at Jewish Museum London
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    • photography
  2. Traditions

    On display at Jewish Museum of Belgium
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  3. Remembering the Kindertransport

    On display at Jewish Museum London
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    • social history
    • history
    • film/video
    • community